International Journal of Prosthodontics and Restorative Dentistry

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2014 | January-March | Volume 4 | Issue 1

EDITORIAL

Dental Implant Complications and Need of Publishing

[Year:2014] [Month:January-March] [Volume:4] [Number:1] [Pages:1] [Pages No:0 - 0]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/ijoprd-4-1-v  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Minu Raju

Comparison of Exothermic Release during the Polymerization of Four Materials used to fabricate Provisional Restorations

[Year:2014] [Month:January-March] [Volume:4] [Number:1] [Pages:5] [Pages No:1 - 5]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1097  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Background and objectives

This in vitro study compared and determined the temperature increase in the pulp chamber of permanent maxillary first premolar teeth placed in contact with different resins used for the fabrication of provisional resto- rations.

Materials and methods

Polymethyl methacrylate (DPI), poly- ethyl methacrylate (SNAP), polyvinylethyl methacrylate (TRIM), bis-acrylic composite (Protemp II) were compared with respect to their exothermic properties during polymerization. Eighty freshly extracted maxillary first premolars were prepared for complete coverage restoration were placed in an acrylic resin block. A thermal probe connected to a digital thermometer was placed into the pulp chamber. Specimens were submerged in a water bath to simulate intraoral conditions. The provisional materials were manipulated according to manufacturer's instructions. The resin mix was placed into template and was then positioned on the prepared tooth. The temperature was recorded during the polymerization at 30-second intervals until it was evident that the peak temperature had been reached.

  After complete polymerization, the template was removed from the tooth and the provisional crown was retrieved. Data was analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparisons test.

Results

Mean temperature increase for the provisional crown fabrication ranged from 38.78°C, 37.79°C, 37.71°C and 35.88°C for polymethyl methacrylate, polyethyl methacrylate, polyvinyl- ethyl methacrylate and bis-acrylic composite respectively.

  Polymethyl methacrylate, polyethyl methacrylate and bisacrylic composite were highly significant.

Interpretation and conclusion

All the materials used were in the safer limit. Hence, by comparing all the four material, Bis-acrylic composite showed least temperature rise in pulp chamber.

How to cite this article

Raju M. Comparison of Exothermic Release during the Polymerization of Four Materials used to fabricate Provisional Restorations. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2014;4(1):1-5.

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Abhishek Sharma, Karan Kapoor, Raj Gaurav Singh, Aanchal Puri, Rohit Mittal

Evaluation of Marginal Bone Level around Platform-Switched Implants

[Year:2014] [Month:January-March] [Volume:4] [Number:1] [Pages:5] [Pages No:6 - 10]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1098  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Purpose

The long-term success of an implant depends on the stability of bone support for the implant. Most crestal bone loss occurs in the first year of implant placement. Platform-switching is an approach which can be clinically applied to preserve the crestal bone. The concept of ‘platform switching’ refers to the use of a smaller-diameter abutment on a larger-diameter implant collar. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate crestal bone level around platform-switched implants.

Materials and methods

Twenty implants with 5 mm diameter were placed in mandibular molar region. All implants had been placed at the crestal level at the time of surgery. Radiographs with grid were obtained 3, 6 and 12 months after loading and were evaluated by screen caliper software measuring the location of the crestal bone level relative to the implant platform.

Results

The implants showed a mean bone loss of 0.76 ± 0.1265 mm on mesial side and 0.72 ± 0.1481 mm on distal side after 1 year.

Conclusion

The findings of the current trial indicated that the use platform-switched implants lead to better preservation of crestal bone.

How to cite this article

Kapoor K, Singh RG, Puri A, Sharma A, Mittal R. Evaluation of Marginal Bone Level around Platform- Switched Implants. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2014;4(1): 6-10.

CASE REPORT

Radhakrishnan Nair, Anoop N Das

Esthetic Rehabilitation of Teeth with Dental Fluorosis

[Year:2014] [Month:January-March] [Volume:4] [Number:1] [Pages:3] [Pages No:11 - 13]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1099  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Nair R, Das AN, Kuriakose MC, Praveena G. Esthetic Rehabilitation of Teeth with Dental Fluorosis. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2014;4(1):11-13.

CASE REPORT

Amit Krishnarao Jagtap, Pradeep Dinkar Chaudhari, Jitendra Anil Bhandari

A Pragmatic Approach to Full Mouth Rehabilitation

[Year:2014] [Month:January-March] [Volume:4] [Number:1] [Pages:6] [Pages No:14 - 19]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1100  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Jagtap AK, Chaudhari PD, Bhandari JA. A Pragmatic Approach to Full Mouth Rehabilitation. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2014;4(1):14-19.

CASE REPORT

Shankar Dange, Trupti Rajendra Agrawal, Smita Khalikar

The Flexible Party Gums: An Esthetic Alternative for Lost Gingiva

[Year:2014] [Month:January-March] [Volume:4] [Number:1] [Pages:3] [Pages No:20 - 22]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1101  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Agrawal TR, Dange S, Khalikar S. The Flexible Party Gums: An Esthetic Alternative for Lost Gingiva. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2014;4(1):20-22.

REVIEW ARTICLE

Minu Raju, Shobha J Rodrigues, Mahesh Mundathaje, Sabaa Qureshi

Three-dimensional Imaging in Implant Assessment for the Prosthodontist: Utilization of the Cone Beam Computed Tomography

[Year:2014] [Month:January-March] [Volume:4] [Number:1] [Pages:11] [Pages No:23 - 33]

PDF  |  DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1102  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Background

The evolution of cone beam computed tomo- graphy three-dimensional (CBCT 3D) imaging has dramatically changed the potential for presurgical and pretreatment planning, such that outcomes are more predictable and complications more avoidable.

Purpose

The purpose of this article was to systematically review scientific and clinical literature pertaining to the uses and benefits of 3D imaging CBCT for diagnosis and treatment planning in Implantology including prosthodontics.

Materials and methods

Various databases, like PubMed, EBSCOhost and ScienceDirect, were searched from 1998 to 2010 to retrieve articles regarding the clinical applications of CBCT in dentistry. Cone beam computed tomography in dentistry was used as a key phrase to extract relevant articles in dentistry. A manual search for the references from the retrieved articles was also completed. The articles published only in English, randomized clinical trials, prospective and retrospective clinical studies, laboratory and computer-generated research were included.

  The search revealed 540 articles of which 447 were irrele- vant to the study and therefore excluded.

Results

Cone beam computed tomography has created an opportunity for clinicians to acquire the highest quality diagno- stic images with an absorbed dose that is comparable to other dental radiological examinations and less than a conventional CT. Therefore, if placement of an implant might approach a nerve, invade the sinus, or penetrate out of the confines of the jawbone, the patient should be offered a discussion of CBCT 3D imaging. In addition, CBCT 3D patients should be advised of the risks, benefits and alternatives to such treatment, based upon any additional data provided by the imaging.

How to cite this article

Rodrigues SJ, Mundathaje M, Raju M, Qureshi S. Three-dimensional Imaging in Implant Assessment for the Prosthodontist: Utilization of the Cone Beam Computed Tomography. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2014;4(1):23-33.

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