International Journal of Prosthodontics and Restorative Dentistry

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VOLUME 10 , ISSUE 1 ( January-March, 2020 ) > List of Articles

CLINICAL TECHNIQUE

Simple Estimation of Movement of the Distal Segment Separately at the Right and Left Vertical Osteotomy Lines in Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy

Kazuhiro Matsushita, Osamu Takamichi, Nobuo Inoue

Keywords : Articulator, Elderly patients, Occlusion, Orthognathic surgery, Rotation, Simulation

Citation Information : Matsushita K, Takamichi O, Inoue N. Simple Estimation of Movement of the Distal Segment Separately at the Right and Left Vertical Osteotomy Lines in Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2020; 10 (1):32-34.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1256

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 01-03-2020

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2020; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

To estimate the linear and rotational movement of the distal segment in sagittal split ramus osteotomy on the right and left sides, we developed a simple method using the common dental materials. This technique was based on the double-split cast method. Two removable intermediate components were used, one for the original mandibular positioning and the other for the postoperative one. In the original position, a wire was fixed at the buccal side of the first molar of the cast model, corresponding to the vertical osteotomy line of the sagittal split ramus osteotomy on the right and left sides. Another wire was fixed at the base of the articulator on each side, so that the upper portion of the wire is adjacently parallel to the one attached to the cast model. The original intermediate component was replaced with the postoperative component, creating a gap between the wires. The gaps reflect the required movement of the distal segment on each side, which often differs between the right and left.


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