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JAYPEE JOURNALS
International Scientific Journals from Jaypee
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1.  REVIEW ARTICLE
Age Determination in Forensic Odontology
Divakar K Prathap
[Year:2017] [Month:January-March] [Volume:7 ] [Number:1] [Pages:41] [Pages No:21-24] [No of Hits : 2537]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1170 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Age determination by means of assessment of the dentition is an application unique to forensic odontology. This process is especially relevant in those cases in which the rest of the skeletal remains are marred, as the tooth remains intact under adverse circumstances while the rest of the skeleton is obliterated. While the process remains complex, multiple methods have been devised to assess the dental age of an individual.

Keywords: Dental pulp, Incremental lines, Radiographs.

How to cite this article: Prathap DK. Age Determination in Forensic Odontology. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2017;7(1):21-24.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
2.  REVIEW ARTICLE
Implants for Auricular Prosthesis
K Ramkumar, C Sabarigirinathan, K Vinayagavel, C Gunasekar, M Dhanaraj
[Year:2017] [Month:January-March] [Volume:7 ] [Number:1] [Pages:41] [Pages No:25-29] [No of Hits : 968]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1171 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Implants are wonderful treatment option for auricular defects as it provides a retentive auricular prosthesis. Auricular defects can be rehabilitated by autogenous and prosthodontic methods. Implants provide retention of auricular prosthesis by bar and clip method and magnets. Implant used in craniofacial region differs from the one which is used in the oral cavity. The implants are shorter with flange on the top, which is a unique feature for implants used in craniofacial region. The major challenge in placing the implant is the proximity of various anatomical structures. The implants should be placed 20 mm distance to the center of the external auditory meatus in 8 and 11 o’clock positions for right side of the face and the 1 and 4 o’clock position for left side. Two implants with distance of 15 mm will be sufficient to satisfy the biomechanics. Proper planning and use of implants with retentive aids like magnet, bar, and clip will provide a satisfactory prosthesis.

Keywords: Auricular defects, Craniofacial implants, Ear prosthesis, Implant-supported auricular prosthesis.

How to cite this article: Ramkumar K, Sabarigirinathan C, Vinayagavel K, Gunasekar C, Dhanaraj M. Implants for Auricular Prosthesis. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2017;7(1):25-29.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
3.  ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Correlation between Intercanthal, Interpupillary, Interalar, and Intercommissural Distance with the Mesiodistal Width of the Maxillary Anteriors: An in vivo Study
Bhushan Bangar, Prashant L Nakade, Ajit Jankar, Suresh Kamble
[Year:2017] [Month:October-December] [Volume:7 ] [Number:4] [Pages:23] [Pages No:109-113] [No of Hits : 674]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1187 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Aim: This study was conducted for the selection of artificial teeth for edentulous patients with the help of extraoral facial measurement.

Materials and methods: The intercanthal distance, interpupillary distance, interalar distance, intercommissural distance, and width of maxillary six anteriors from a total of 250 subjects were measured clinically. The measurements were made with the help of a digital caliper. Student’s t-test was used to find the significance of parameters between male and female. Pearson correlation has been used to find the relation of the parameters.

Results: The total mean of 125 male subjects for intercanthal distance, interpupillary distance, interalar distance, intercommissural distance, and intercanine width was 31.58, 62.27, 34.77, 48.87, and 50.22 mm respectively. However, the total mean of 125 female subjects for intercanthal distance, interpupillary distance, interalar distance, intercommissural distance, intercanine width was 30.58, 61.48, 34.58, 48.20, and 49.34 mm respectively. The paired t-test showed highly significant results in relation to intercanthal distance and width of maxillary six anteriors. However, interalar distance was found to be nonsignificant and interpupillary and intercommissural distance was significant.

Conclusion: It can be concluded that although various methods for the selection of teeth are used, the applicability can vary due to the ethnic differences between populations. The multiplication factor for intercanthal distance, interpupillary distance, interalar distance, intercommissural distance was 1.6, 0.8, 1.4, and 1 in order to obtain the mesiodistal width of maxillary six anteriors respectively, in males and females. The values were greater for men than for women. No significant differences were found between sexes with respect to intercanthal distance.

Clinical significance: Although there are ethnic differences between populations, the proportions/relationships of anatomical landmarks to the teeth remain the same, which helps in the selection of artificial teeth for edentulous patients.

Keywords: Interalar distance, Intercanthal distance, Intercommissural distance and width of maxillary six anteriors, Interpupillary distance.

How to cite this article: Bangar B, Nakade PL, Jankar A, Kamble S. Correlation between Intercanthal, Interpupillary, Interalar, and Intercommissural Distance with the Mesiodistal Width of the Maxillary Anteriors: An in vivo Study. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2017;7(4):109-113.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
4.  ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Evaluation of the Correlation between the Vertical Dimension of Occlusion and the Length of the Ear, Nose, and Little Finger: An Anthropometric Study
Janhavi J Rege, Sulekha S Gosavi, Siddharth Y Gosavi, Shivsagar Tewary, Abhijeet Kore
[Year:2017] [Month:January-March] [Volume:7 ] [Number:1] [Pages:41] [Pages No:1-7] [No of Hits : 569]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1167 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The aim of this study was to find out the anthropometric correlation of vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) with the length of ear, nose, and little finger in dentate male and female subjects in Karad population, so as to use this correlation to determine VDO in edentulous patients.

Materials and methods: The study was conducted in Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences Deemed University, Karad, India, on 320 dentate subjects (160 males and 160 females) who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Anthropometric measurements of VDO, length of ear, length of nose, and length of little finger were recorded using a digital vernier caliper. Simple linear regression model was used to develop a prediction formula for VDO using length of ear, nose, and little finger as the independent variable. Correlation between VDO and length of ear, nose, and little finger was studied using Pearson’s correlation test.

Results: Statistical analysis in male and female subjects showed that VDO is significantly different with the length of nose, ear, and little finger. Pearson correlation test showed VDO in males has strong coefficient correlation with the length of the ear (r = 0.500), and strong coefficient correlation with the length of the nose (r = 0.335) in females.

Conclusion: The regression analysis was conducted to formulate the regression equation for determination of VDO in male and female subjects. The study revealed that the length of ear in males [VDO = 25.591 + 0.565 (length of ear)] and the length of nose in females [VDO = 36.933 + 0.353 (length of nose)] are strongly correlated with VDO.

Clinical significance: The regression formulae were formulated for male and female subjects in dentate patients which can be used to determine the VDO in edentulous patients.

Keywords: Anthropometry, Ear length, Little finger length, Nose length, Vertical dimension of occlusion.

How to cite this article: Rege JJ, Gosavi SS, Gosavi SY, Tewary S, Kore A. Evaluation of the Correlation between the Vertical Dimension of Occlusion and the Length of the Ear, Nose,and Little Finger: An Anthropometric Study. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2017;7(1):1-7.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
5.  REVIEW ARTICLE
An Appraisal on Occlusal Philosophies in Full-mouth Rehabilitation: A Literature Review
Ankita Parmar, Vivek Choukse, Umesh Palekar, Rajeev Srivastava
[Year:2016] [Month:October-December] [Volume:6 ] [Number:4] [Pages:26] [Pages No:89-92] [No of Hits : 2029]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1163 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Restoration of occlusion in patients with mutilated dentition is a challenging situation as every case is unique in itself. There is a great apprehension involved in reconstructing worn-out dentition due to widely divergent opinions regarding the choice of an appropriate occlusal scheme. A critical assessment and subsequent scientific validation of available literature on occlusal philosophies in full-mouth rehabilitation require an understanding of their evolution in the formative years and the subsequent development of effective models for clinical practice. This study overviews the various occlusal concepts/philosophies in fullmouth rehabilitation, which will help the clinician to select an appropriate occlusal scheme for an individual case.

Keywords: Centric occlusion, Centric relation, Functionally generated path, Occlusal vertical dimension, Pankey-Mann- Schuyler concept, Temporomandibular joint disorder.

How to cite this article: Parmar A, Choukse V, Palekar U, Srivastava R. An Appraisal on Occlusal Philosophies in Fullmouth Rehabilitation: A Literature Review. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2016;6(4):89-92.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
6.  ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Simplifying Direct Pattern Technique using Fiber Post
Reda M Dimashkieh, Mohiddin R Dimashkieh, Amir M Dimashkieh
[Year:2016] [Month:April-June] [Volume:6 ] [Number:2] [Pages:45] [Pages No:25-27] [No of Hits : 1520]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1149 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Direct intraoral fabrication of cast post and core restorations for endodontically treated teeth can be challenging and time consuming. In addition, accurate intraoral fabrication of resin patterns with intracervicular margins is not always possible as a result of restricted access and difficult isolation.
This article presents a direct-indirect method that uses different diameters of prefabricated posts as fiber post and polyvinyl siloxane material as a mold for fabrication of multiple post patterns.

Keywords: Cast post, Direct-indirect pattern, Fiber post, Intraradicular restoration, Restoration of endodontically treated teeth.

How to cite this article: Dimashkieh RM, Dimashkieh MR, Dimashkieh AM. Simplifying Direct Pattern Technique using Fiber Post. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2016;6(2):25-27.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
7.  CASE REPORT
A Chair-side Technique to verify the Parallelism of Fixed Partial Denture Abutments
Rafat I Farah
[Year:2016] [Month:January-March] [Volume:6 ] [Number:1] [Pages:23] [Pages No:21-23] [No of Hits : 982]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1148 | FREE

ABSTRACT

This report describes a chair-side technique to verify the parallelism of fixed partial denture abutments; this technique facilitates assessment of extraoral preparation and the detection of undercuts prior to making a definitive impression. This technique utilizes casts fabricated from polyvinyl siloxane impression material and a class II laser module attached to a dental surveyor.

Keywords: Abutments parallelism, Dental surveyor, Laser, Path of insertion.

How to cite this article: Farah RI. A Chair-side Technique to verify the Parallelism of Fixed Partial Denture Abutments. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2016;6(1):21-23.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: The author declares that there is no conflict of interest regarding the publication of this article.

 
8.  RESEARCH ARTICLE
Softening Condition of Impression Compound for Border molding of Removable Dentures
Tomofumi Takano, Yoshihiro Kugimiya, Takashi Koike, Takayuki Ueda, Kaoru Sakurai
[Year:2016] [Month:April-June] [Volume:6 ] [Number:2] [Pages:45] [Pages No:37-42] [No of Hits : 803]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1152 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To prepare removable dentures, border molding using an impression compound has been employed for a long time to obtain a denture border morphology harmonized with perioral muscle movement. However, border molding using impression compound is performed following practitioner’s empirical rule. The objective of this study is to clarify the optimum softening conditions of impression compound for border molding, for which we measured the pressure assumed to be loaded on impression compound during border molding.

Materials and methods: The pressure assumed to be loaded on an impression compound during border molding was measured using a tongue pressure-measuring device. Based on the measured pressure, appropriate softening conditions were investigated (softening temperature and water immersion time) for three types of impression compound: Red (Impression compound Red, Kerr, USA), green (Peri Compound, GC, Japan), and pink (Iso Compound, GC, Japan).

Results: The measured pressure was significantly different between those in the oral vestibule in the lower anterior tooth region during tugging the mouth corner, and in the gingivobuccal fold of the lower first molar during large mouth opening. Regarding the impression compound softening condition, red was deformed by all measured muscle pressures after immersion in 60°C water for 30 seconds and 65°C water for 20, 25, and 30 seconds. Green was deformed by all measured muscle pressures after immersion in 60°C water for 30 seconds, and 65°C water for 25 and 30 seconds. In contrast, pink was deformed by all measured muscle pressures after immersion in 55°C water for 25 and 30 seconds.

Conclusion: It was clarified that for border molding, muscle pressures of all regions during the functional movements can be registered using red and green softened by immersion in 60°C water for 30 seconds and pink softened by immersion for 20 seconds.

Keywords: Border molding, Functional movement, Impression compound, Tongue pressure measuring device.

How to cite this article: Takano T, Kugimiya Y, Koike T, Ueda T, Sakurai K. Softening Condition of Impression Compound for Border molding of Removable Dentures. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2016;6(2):37-42.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
9.  CASE REPORT
Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a partially Amputated Finger using a Silicone Prosthesis
Teny Fernandez, K Harshakumar, R Ravichandran
[Year:2016] [Month:January-March] [Volume:6 ] [Number:1] [Pages:23] [Pages No:10-13] [No of Hits : 687]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1145 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Amputation of a finger will have considerable functional and psychological impact on an individual. Although prosthetic rehabilitation incorporating implants is considered an ideal treatment option, the patient may not give consent due to apprehension toward surgical procedures. The ideal prosthesis should replace the missing part of the finger so precisely that it would not draw the attention of the observer. Fabrication of such a prosthesis will require great technical and artistic expertise. This paper presents a case of prosthetic rehabilitation of an amputated finger using a silicone finger prosthesis.

Keywords: Amputation, Finger prosthesis, Prosthetic finger, Silicone.

How to cite this article: Fernandez T, Harshakumar K, Ravichandran R. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a partially Amputated Finger using a Silicone Prosthesis. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2016;6(1):10-13.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
10.  REVIEW ARTICLE
Prosthetic Management of Total Glossectomy Patients
Varun Yarramaneni, Dhanasekar Balakrishnan, IN Aparna, Saumya Kapoor
[Year:2016] [Month:July-September] [Volume:6 ] [Number:3] [Pages:26] [Pages No:66-68] [No of Hits : 679]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10019-1158 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Background: Total glossectomy impairs various functions of tongue, such as mastication, speech, swallowing, and also results in psychological breach for the patient during social activities. In a glossectomy patient, the new size of the oral cavity often produces a change in the resonance associated with certain sounds. Also, due to the decrease in size and function of the tongue, interruption occurs in articulation patterns between the tongue, the hard and soft palate, and the teeth.

Materials and methods: We performed a review with a bibliographic search in Scopus, Web of Science along with the PubMed/Medline, Google scholar and internet. We included the articles with major contribution toward management of total glossectomy, excluded articles and works about surgical treatments in anatomical locations other than the oral cavity.

Conclusion: To obtain maximum rehabilitation for these patients, the dentist must have a thorough knowledge of the physiologic processes involved in oral functions. The present article is an overview of various objectives and design concepts for rehabilitation of a total glossectomized patient.

Keywords: Glossectomy, Linguoalveolar, Mastication, Neuromuscular, Resonance.

How to cite this article: Yarramaneni V, Balakrishnan D, Aparna IN, Kapoor S. Prosthetic Management of Total Glossectomy Patients. Int J Prosthodont Restor Dent 2016;6(3):66-68.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
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